Network Rail shares progress of work on Brighton main line

THESE images show how well advanced major works on Brighton’s mainline are as nine consecutive days of closures come to an end.

No trains have run between Brighton, Lewes and Three Bridges since Saturday February 19, due to a £15million rail upgrade by Network Rail.

The upgrade, which was designed to “give passengers more reliable rail service”, is due to end on Sunday, but further work is scheduled for March 5 and 6, as well as April 12.

Network Rail shares progress of work on Brighton mainline after nine-day closure

Photos released by Network Rail show the extent of the work, including the replacement of over 1,000 meters of track at Copyhold Junction, between the Ouse Valley Viaduct and Haywards Heath station.

It is hoped that this will increase the speed of the line and assist in the resumption of service in the event of delays.

Work is also underway to build an underpass to replace the Woodside level crossing in Hassocks.

The Argus: Work is also underway to construct an underpass to replace the Woodside level crossing at HassocksWork is also underway to build an underpass to replace the Woodside level crossing in Hassocks

A Network Rail spokesman said: ‘Where the Woodside level crossing used to be, we now see an underpass which will allow people to cross safely under the tracks.

“We had to fight against the wind to dig tons of earth, secure the signal and power cables before lifting 24 sections of concrete in place.

“A waterproof liner is placed over the concrete sections. We are now going to rebuild the railway track on the underpass so that trains can run again next week. »

Work continued throughout Storm Eunice and Storm Franklin, which hit Sussex with high winds last week.

The Argus: Works on Copyhold Junction, between the Ouse Valley Viaduct and Haywards Heath StationWorks on Copyhold Junction, between the Ouse Valley Viaduct and Haywards Heath Station

The rail company said the crossing had been used by people attempting suicide, and it hopes its replacement will help save lives.

Beneath the track at Haywards Heath, construction workers constructed a 30m wall and used nearly 300 five-metre soil nails to stabilize the embankment to prevent future delays.

The closure also allowed work to begin on the reconstruction of the Balcombe Tunnel, with a focus on improving drainage to improve the longevity of the track.

During the long shutdown, Southern and Thameslink customers were forced to use rail replacement buses.

Network Rail said the nine-day closure allows it to “work around the clock” and causes less disruption than carrying out work at weekends and evenings.

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